Charles Spurgeon Quotes
Some Of My Personal Favorites

Do you have any favorite Charles Spurgeon quotes? I do!


I'd heard of C.H. Spurgeon growing up in church, of course, but I hadn't really read any of his writings or listened to any of his sermons until I was an adult.


The first time I really remember any of his writings making an impact on me was during my senior year of Bible college.


There was a young man that I had become good friends with (and dated a few times) named Truitt Suhl. He loved the Lord very much, and we enjoyed talking about the things of God together.


Truitt was reading the autobiography of CH Spurgeon and was telling me about some of the ways the Lord was speaking to his heart through some of Spurgeon's writings.


On one of our dates he brought me a page that he had copied out of the book, C.H. Spurgeon: The Early Years. The excerpt came from pages 81-82 when Spurgeon was speaking of his conversion and Truitt included a handwritten quote from an earlier page.


The first of those Charles Spurgeon quotes was a fitting intro to the excerpt that he was giving me. This is what it said...

    "Thinking is better than possessing books. I owe much to many hours and even days spent alone under an old oak tree by the river Midway."

    It was during a time of thought and meditation that Spurgeon entered a time machine, going back to the day when Christ was crucified. (Psalm 39:3 "...while I was musing the fire burned...")



Truitt taped that handwritten note just above the second (and much longer) of the Charles Spurgeon quotes which I'm going to share with you now. Really think on this as you read and put yourself in the place of the writer...

    I saw this Friend, my best, my only Friend, murdered. I stooped down in sad affright, and looked at Him. I saw that His hands had been pierced with rough iron nails, and His feet had been rent in the same way.


    There was misery in His dead countenance so terrible that I scarcely dared to look upon it. His body was emaciated with hunger, His back was red with bloody scourges, and His brow had a circle of wounds about it: clearly could one see that these had been pierced by thorns.


    I shuddered, for I had known this Friend full well. He never had a fault; He was the purest of the pure, the holiest of the holy. Who could have injure Him? For He never injured any man: all His life long He "went about doing good;"


    He had healed the sick. He had fed the hungry. He had raised the dead. For which of these works did they kill Him?


    He had never breathed out anything else but love; and as I looked into the poor sorrowful face, so full of agony, and yet so full of love, I wondered who could have been a wretch so vile as to pierce hands like His.


    I said within myself, "Where can these traitors live? Who are these that could have smitten such an One as this?"


    Had they murdered an oppressor, we might have forgiven them; had they slain one who had indulged in vice or villainy, it might have been his desert; had it been a murderer and a rebel, or one who had committed sedition, we would have said, "Bury his corpse: justice has at last given him his due."


    But when Thou wast slain, my best, my only beloved, where lodged the traitors? Let me seize them, and they shall be put to death. If there be torments that I can devise, surely they shall endure them all.


    Oh! what jealousy, what revenge I felt! If I might but find these murderers, what would I not do with them!


    And as I looked upon that corpse, I heard a footstep, and wondered where it was. I listened, and I clearly perceive that the murderer was close at hand.


    It was dark, and I groped about to find him. I found that, somehow or other, wherever I put out my hand, I could not meet with him, for he was nearer to me than my hand would go.


    At last I put my hand upon my breast. "I have thee now," said I; for lo! he was in my own heart; the murderer was hiding within my own bosom, dwelling in the recesses of my inmost soul.


    Ah! then I wept indeed, that I, in the very presence of my murdered Master, should be harbouring the murderer, and I felt myself most guilty while I bowed over His corpse, and sang that plaintive hymn --

      "'Twas you, my sins, my cruel sins,
      His chief tormentors were;
      Each of my crimes became a nail,
      And unbelief the spear."

I hope you can see why those two Charles Spurgeon quotes had a lasting impact on my heart. I've carried that page Truitt copied out for me with me around the world and still read it from time to time almost 25 years later.


If you'd like to get a copy of this Spurgeon autobiography, or one of the others available, I highly recommend them. The Bible should be our greatest source of spiritual food, but the writings of some of God's servants can also speak to your heart in a way that feeds your soul.


Here are a selection of books with plenty of Charles Spurgeon Quotes for your enjoyment and enrichment...






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